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Wednesday
Aug212013

APT’s Elegant and Sparse Anthony and Cleopatra

The Touchstone Theatre at Spring Green’s American Players Theatre inspires the legendary company to take dramatic risks. Staging William Shakespeare’s Anthony and Cleopatra by incorporating a mere seven characters that act the story within three hours embodies a small miracle on opening weekend. With certainty, APT’s Anthony and Cleopatra: An Adaption relies on the assured genius of Kate Buckley, Director, and James DeVita, actor as Mark Anthony, who collaboratively adapted this production to an ephemeral essence of the play’s politics and romance.

An experienced APT cast illuminates the production further, including debuting company member Abbey Siegworth playing Cleopatra’s singular maid of honour Charmian in lieu of Colleen Madden who suffered a family emergency. Somehow the shortened version cystallizes the contemporary aesthetics in the historically based romance performed in the intimacy of the air-conditioned Touchstone.

For those theatre-goers less familiar with ancient history, Shakespeare had originally toyed with all the absolute facts surrounding these characters taken from Roman antiquity. However, the two main male characters, Mark Anthony and Octavius Caesar ruled Rome in a triumviri with another royal. Cleopatra led Egyptian culture from a cosmopolitan Alexandria, as one of the most intriguing feminine leaders the world has known.

Literally, hundreds of writers in every discipline have discussed the philosophical, political, racial and romantic underpinnings to the Shakespearean script since the first production in 1608. Myths surrounding Cleopatra and Mark Anthony also recall the subsequent stereotypes and various interpretations that have been embraced and known by audiences in 2013.

Perhaps the APT adaptation strips away some of these stereotypes when staging the production in the Art Deco period, complete with 1930’s costumes designed by Robert Morgan, a stark set by Nathan Stuber and a chimerical lighting backdrop by Noelle Stollmack. The serene and sophisticated nature of the technical elements transcends an audience’s previous inclinations towards the famous or infamous couple and the resulting iconic films to look at the production, the performance, the meaning with fresh eyes.

Cleopatra was an enigmatic woman, sensual and savvy, a powerful seducer in both the political and romantic realms, an intelligent, feminine force to be reckoned with.  A queen Tracy Michelle Arnold inhabits by dressing in luxurious satin garments worthy of an exotic Erté illustration. Her costumes envision ambition, leadership, royalty and sexuality, a complex set of qualities for any woman and actress Arnold carries with ease.

Her romantic paramour Marc Anthony comes to the stage in DeVita, black bearded and headed, with a lust for power and Cleopatra’s passion, which conflicts in this play to his demise. As his political partner and then rival, Christopher Sheard stands regally in pressed suits as Caesar, with Eric Parks acting as Thidias, his valiant cohort. James Ridge serves as a fine interpreter of Enobarbus, dissecting the character’s divided loyalties to both leaders towards his own destruction. While a capable and young Will Mobley remains ever faithful to Anthony in the part of Eros.

Only a cast this gifted could set their sights on an ambitious production that moves quickly through this set of cataclysmic events to christen the eventual Roman Empire. The fierce and fleeting production unfurls as seamlessly as the stage’s singular silk column, that becomes both pillar in court, dressing curtain in a bedchamber, and billowing sail on one of Anthony’s doomed battle ships at sea.

APT’s Anthony and Cleopatra resembles an intoxicating aroma of a fragrance when compared to a full blooded perfrum and production, yet releases a scent equally alluring and potent. The performance’s potency equals the allure of power that continually seduces modern humanity, still frail and flawed since this ancient time, whether misconstrued for countries, fortunes or love. An allure that Shakespeare speaks of in his play’s verse, relates to the dramatic fragrance that captured the audience’s complete attention in APT’s unique adaptation. With the production’s essence similar to the bard’s words when he wrote, “the air seemed dizzy with love…the winds were lovesick with them.”

American Players Theatre presents William Shakespeare’s Anthony and Cleopatra through the fall season. For further information on the performance schedule or tickets, please call 608.588.2361 or click the APT link to the left.   by Peggy Sue Dunigan

 

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